Agricultural and Resource Economics

Postgraduate profiles

 

Contact

Karen Barroga

Phone: (+61 8) 6488 3665
Fax: (+61 8) 6488 1098


Supervisors

Start date

Jun 2006

Submission date

Dec 2009

Curriculum vitae

Karen Barroga CV
[doc, 2,224.49 kb]
Updated 16 Jun 2009

Karen Barroga

Karen Barroga profile photo

Thesis

Perceptions of Technology Attributes and Learning in Farmers' Adoption of Multi-component and Preventive Rice Technologies in the Philippines

Summary

To avoid high input use and prevent environmental damage yet still achieve good yields, rice production technologies promoted to farmers have become more complex - specifically, multi-component and preventive. Farmers might need to understand more technical information and learn new skills (for example, to know how much or when a farm input is needed) whereas in the past they used single, productivity technologies such as seeds and pesticides.

This can inhibit the use and spread of complex technologies, particularly in countries where farmers' education is limited and the extension system is weak, such as in the Philippines.

My study is looking into how farmers perceive and learn these complex rice technologies to better understand their generally slow and limited adoption - particularly by rice farmers in Nueva Ecija, Philippines. The integrated weed management (IWM) and integrated crop management systems are the technologies being studied.

Why my research is important

The Philippines is challenged to produce 65 percent more rice, as its population is projected to rise to 107 million by 2025-2030. My study may help provide a significant and useful contribution in improving the delivery and adoption of these complex technologies, which appear to be the country's main solution for better rice yield without harming the environment.

Specifically, the study could help identify constraints to their adoption (in terms of farmer perceptions of their attributes) and how they are learning these technologies. With these findings, extension efforts could be better targetted.

The study also fills a gap in the literature on the understanding of complexity in innovations, which has been identified as a major adoption-inhibiting factor in a recent review of technology adoption studies.

Funding

  • Australian Centre for International and Agricultural Research (ACIAR)
  • Philippine Rice Research Institute (PhilRice)

 
Agricultural and Resource Economics
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